Andre Brik

Andre Brik was born in Curitiba, Brazil in 1972. Architect, illustrator, and art director, he also studied typography and graphic design at the School of Visual Arts and at Parsons School of Design in New York.

In his works, you can find some of the 1920’s Plakatstil graphic style and polish posters with their clean lines and flat contrasting background colors, their visual puns and wit, and subtle irony. There is also nonsense, humor, counterculture, dada, surrealism, and punk rock. The ideas are born from the observation of the elements of everyday objects. Then the artist begins a long process of sketching to deconstruct and recombine shapes, colors, and meanings. Finally, a careful selection of outcoming ideas is chosen to be digitally developed, painted, and finished as a graphic art illustration.

Surf Spots Series

Andre Brik, 2016-2021
9 works from € 360.00 to 530.00
Surf Spots Series

I've been surfing since I was 11. I was never good at it, but it never stopped me from having some of the best feelings.

Being in an environment that is not yours, watching the fish passing by, birds swooping down. Once even a porpoise (a species of dolphin) showed its hump almost on my side.

Just imagine the face I made after that.

Another thing that attracts me is the shapes and colors that only can be seen when we are surfing.

The surface of the water can be smooth like a blue quilt being shaken. Wave shapes are seen from new angles. Offshore winds hit the crest and raise a beautiful spray. Sun highlights reflect on the ocean.

Then you get a wave, drop the water wall, ride it, sometimes manage to do a tricky maneuver.

When the wave ends, almost at the beach, and you get off the board, it's hard not to smile from ear to ear.

Or sometimes even give a shout of joy, for having managed to tame nature, even for a few seconds, and with all possible respect for it.

Barra do Sai - Guaratuba - Brazil (surf spots series)
Fort Point - San Francisco - CA (surf spots series)
Mappin - Caioba - Brazil (surf spots series)

I've been surfing since I was 11. I was never good at it, but it never stopped me from having some of the best feelings.

Being in an environment that is not yours, watching the fish passing by, birds swooping down. Once even a porpoise (a species of dolphin) showed its hump almost on my side.

Just imagine the face I made after that.

Another thing that attracts me is the shapes and colors that only can be seen when we are surfing.

The surface of the water can be smooth like a blue quilt being shaken. Wave shapes are seen from new angles. Offshore winds hit the crest and raise a beautiful spray. Sun highlights reflect on the ocean.

Then you get a wave, drop the water wall, ride it, sometimes manage to do a tricky maneuver.

When the wave ends, almost at the beach, and you get off the board, it's hard not to smile from ear to ear.

Or sometimes even give a shout of joy, for having managed to tame nature, even for a few seconds, and with all possible respect for it.

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Geometric Redux Studies

Andre Brik, 2019-2020
8 works from € 360.00
Geometric Redux Studies

For the geometric redux reinterpretation homage series, I start observing the masterpiece painting in detail: the palette of colors used, the contrasts between light and shadow, the shades, and the shapes.

Then I sketch a lot, deconstructing the original composition in basic shapes and primary colors. I also use a support grid, a "flexible template" that helps me to find the simplification possibilities without limiting the creativity. Within this grid, I search for alignments, patterns, stylizations, color reductions and shapes up to a maximum point of formal simplification, just a step before the original work can't be recognized.

And then I put the "puzzle" pieces together on the computer, fitting shapes and overlapping transparent gradients as in a vectorial “vellatura” so I can recreate the original artwork in my style.

Geometric Redux Study after Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks
Geometric Redux Study after Georgia O’Keeffe’s Cow’s Skull: Red, White and Blue
Geometric Redux Study after Klimt’s The Kiss

For the geometric redux reinterpretation homage series, I start observing the masterpiece painting in detail: the palette of colors used, the contrasts between light and shadow, the shades, and the shapes.

Then I sketch a lot, deconstructing the original composition in basic shapes and primary colors. I also use a support grid, a "flexible template" that helps me to find the simplification possibilities without limiting the creativity. Within this grid, I search for alignments, patterns, stylizations, color reductions and shapes up to a maximum point of formal simplification, just a step before the original work can't be recognized.

And then I put the "puzzle" pieces together on the computer, fitting shapes and overlapping transparent gradients as in a vectorial “vellatura” so I can recreate the original artwork in my style.

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Still Life is Not Dead

Andre Brik, 2015-2022
38 works from € 330.00 to 770.00
Still Life is Not Dead

My still-life ideas come up mainly with the observation of everyday things, sometimes during conversations, when I'm watching a movie,
or scrolling on social media. When I travel, on conversations, before bedtime. Sometimes during a more monotonous meeting. Some are childhood memories. Many times, an artwork appeared ready-made in front of my eyes while I'm cooking.

Because of my architectural background, I like to develop his ideas by making a lot of sketches. Drawing helps me play with shapes using dynamic hand movements, following the speed of my thoughts. In this process, I seek for alignments, work with repetitions, and simplify the composition elements.

Then I decide on the technique to be used: colored pencils, acrylic painting, linocut. But in most cases, I go digital and use the computer or the iPad. I believe that they are great tools to express creativity and produce high-quality art.

A Primeira Tesselação do Pinhão
Apple Strip 1
Avocado

My still-life ideas come up mainly with the observation of everyday things, sometimes during conversations, when I'm watching a movie,
or scrolling on social media. When I travel, on conversations, before bedtime. Sometimes during a more monotonous meeting. Some are childhood memories. Many times, an artwork appeared ready-made in front of my eyes while I'm cooking.

Because of my architectural background, I like to develop his ideas by making a lot of sketches. Drawing helps me play with shapes using dynamic hand movements, following the speed of my thoughts. In this process, I seek for alignments, work with repetitions, and simplify the composition elements.

Then I decide on the technique to be used: colored pencils, acrylic painting, linocut. But in most cases, I go digital and use the computer or the iPad. I believe that they are great tools to express creativity and produce high-quality art.

Discover all works from this collection